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Archive: October, 2010
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While his wife Jaime looks on, Gunnery Sgt. Tim Clark kisses his infant son Ethan shortly after seeing him for the first time Oct. 15, 2010, when he and 78 other personnel from Marine Air Control Squadron 1 returned home to the Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Ariz., from a more than six month deployment to Afghanistan. Ethan was born in June, while his father served as the senior air director for the squadron's tactical air operations center, which managed airspace in southern Afghanistan for approximately 50,000 flights in seven months. "It's very good to finally meet this little guy," said Clark, who also has a 4-year-old daughter Payton. Both Tim and Jaime are natives of Birmingham, Ala. - While his wife Jaime looks on, Gunnery Sgt. Tim Clark kisses his infant son Ethan shortly after seeing him for the first time Oct. 15, 2010, when he and 78 other personnel from Marine Air Control Squadron 1 returned home to the Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Ariz., from a more than six month deployment to Afghanistan. Ethan was born in June, while his father served as the senior air director for the squadron's tactical air operations center, which managed airspace in southern Afghanistan for approximately 50,000 flights in seven months. "It's very good to finally meet this little guy," said Clark, who also has a 4-year-old daughter Payton. Both Tim and Jaime are natives of Birmingham, Ala.

Staff Sgt. Robert Farmer, Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 4 ordnance chief, prepares a high-speed, anti-radiation missile, after mounting it on an EA-6B Prowler jet with the rest of the VMAQ-4 ordnance team at the Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Ariz., Oct. 8, 2010. Later, the Prowler jets fired nine HARMs at targets in the Pacific Ocean. The squadron specializes in electronic warfare using the HARM, which detects electromagnetic radiation given off by enemy radars or anti-aircraft weapons, and is also the only missile Prowlers launch. - Staff Sgt. Robert Farmer, Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 4 ordnance chief, prepares a high-speed, anti-radiation missile, after mounting it on an EA-6B Prowler jet with the rest of the VMAQ-4 ordnance team at the Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Ariz., Oct. 8, 2010. Later, the Prowler jets fired nine HARMs at targets in the Pacific Ocean. The squadron specializes in electronic warfare using the HARM, which detects electromagnetic radiation given off by enemy radars or anti-aircraft weapons, and is also the only missile Prowlers launch.

Fernando Godinez, left, TRAX Test Services maintenance crewman, welds the support brace of a fake radar dish on the top of a target shaped like a radar van at the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range, Sept. 29, 2010, as Alex Ribas, TRAX Test Services maintenance crewman, supports the dish. A five-man team traveled the remote areas of the range inspecting and repairing the hundreds of targets in anticipation of the beginning of the Weapons and Tactics Instructor course. TRAX and the station’s Range Maintenance section construct and repair more than 300 targets to provide aviators with a realistic training environment before each WTI. - Fernando Godinez, left, TRAX Test Services maintenance crewman, welds the support brace of a fake radar dish on the top of a target shaped like a radar van at the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range, Sept. 29, 2010, as Alex Ribas, TRAX Test Services maintenance crewman, supports the dish. A five-man team traveled the remote areas of the range inspecting and repairing the hundreds of targets in anticipation of the beginning of the Weapons and Tactics Instructor course. TRAX and the station’s Range Maintenance section construct and repair more than 300 targets to provide aviators with a realistic training environment before each WTI.

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